Exploring Prehistoric Life

Wed, 2016-12-14

How photography and digital art can bring prehistoric creatures back to life.

Wed, 2016-12-07

During the Mesozoic, or “Middle Life” Era, life diversified rapidly and giant reptiles, dinosaurs and other monstrous beasts roamed the Earth. The period, which spans from about 252 million years ago to about 66 million years ago, was also known as the age of reptiles or the...

Wed, 2016-12-07

During the new DC Comics Universe series “Flashpoint,” in which a time-traveling supervillain alters the past to warp the present, Life’s Little Mysteries presents a 10-part series that examines what would happen if a major event in the history of the universe had gone...

Wed, 2016-12-07

The earliest creatures to crawl out of the water onto land may have concocted antacids out of their own bones, a clever innovation that would’ve let the animals breathe, researchers now find.

Wed, 2016-12-07

Trilobites are distant relatives of lobsters, spiders and insects that died off more than 250 million years ago, before the dinosaurs even came into existence. They prowled the seas for roughly 270 million years, longer than the Age of Dinosaurs, and new species of trilobites...

Wed, 2016-12-07

The Cambrian Period is the first geological time period of the Paleozoic Era (the “time of ancient life”). This period lasted about 53 million years and marked a dramatic burst of evolutionary changes in life on Earth, known as the “Cambrian Explosion.” Among the animals that...

Wed, 2016-12-07

The Paleozoic Era, which ran from about 542 million years ago to 251 million years ago, was a time of great change on Earth. The era began with the breakup of one supercontinent and the formation of another. Plants became widespread. And the first vertebrate animals colonized...

Wed, 2016-12-07

Synapsids (Greek, ‘fused arch’), synonymous with theropsids (Greek, ‘beast-face’), are a group of animals that includes mammals and every animal more closely related to mammals than to other living amniotes. They are...

Tue, 2016-12-06

The Permian Period was the final period of the Paleozoic Era. Lasting from 299 million to 251 million years ago, it followed the Carboniferous Period and preceded the Triassic Period. By the early Permian, the two great continents of the Paleozoic, ...

Mon, 2016-12-05

If I’d list down all their species then that would be more than a hundred thousand, so diverse was the kingdom of this terrestrial reptile. Since quite enough we have been conjured up by the aura of that one mosquito bite which could bring that vogue extinct race back...

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